I know I can… represent, creatively

By Malcolm White

Throughout Black History Month, we took special care to read about and discuss how inspirational people in our community celebrate black history, while also fostering the next generation of black leaders.

In that vein, we found something, thought it was really powerful, and wanted to share with you. As a minority business enterprise, Warhol & WALL ST. knows how important it is to have strong representation in all aspects of life. Part of our business philosophy is to intentionally work with a diverse team of people and to prioritize inclusion in a meaningful way. As Black History Month draws to a close, we wanted to share some content that moved the needle for us in all of the right ways.

We came across two separate articles recently that explore how representation is framed in literature. First Lady Michelle Obama, in Vulture Magazine, touched on why it’s so important to have a wide range of cultural depiction in the media: “For so many people, television and movies may be the only way they understand people who aren’t like them,” she says. “And when I come across many little black girls who come up to me over the course of these 7 ½ years with tears in their eyes, and they say: ‘Thank you for being a role model for me. I don’t see educated black women on TV, and the fact that you’re first lady validates who I am.’”

“And when I come across many little black girls who come up to me over the course of these 7 ½ years with tears in their eyes, and they say: ‘Thank you for being a role model for me. I don’t see educated black women on TV, and the fact that you’re first lady validates who I am.’”

Michelle Obama said it best. Far too often, when topics of diversity and inclusion come up, the conversation turns into an exercise where the same stereotypical tropes are regurgitated. That’s why we love to read about things like a new series of black picture books that shatter societal expectations, or people like Martellus Bennett who are daring black boys to dream beyond stereotypes.

At Warhol & WALL ST., we continue to find ways to showcase strong, diverse depictions of representation — even beyond Black History Month. We build platforms for expression and tell holistic stories because we believe, fundamentally, that stereotypes do not define our past, present or future.